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Mama Africa! How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with her Song
Exhibition of Illustrated Africana Children's Literature
Monday, January 28, 2019 - Sunday, May 26, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Hammond's House Museum, will host Mama Africa!: How Miriam Makeba Spread Hope with Her Song, a compelling new exhibition featuring the illustrated children’s literature of award-winning artist/illustrator Charly Palmer. These vivid paintings pulsing with color, movement, and emotion creating a driving visual narrative that alight on significant events, in the life of Miriam Makeba, such as her flight from her homeland in disguise, her powerful testimony at the United Nations, the horrific Soweto killings, and Nelson Mandela’s release from jail, ending with the singer’s triumphant return home after apartheid is ended. Miriam Makeba, a Grammy Award-winning South African singer, rose to fame in the hearts of her people at the pinnacle of apartheid―a brutal system of segregation similar to American Jim Crow laws. Mama Africa, as they called her, raised her voice to help combat injustice. Charly Palmer is a graphic designer, illustrator, and fine artist who studied art and design at the American Academy of Art and the School of the Art Institute, both in Chicago. Mama Africa! is his first picture book. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture
A Historical Photographic Exhibition
Monday, February 24, 2019 - Sunday, May 26, 2019 
In recognition of Black History Month (2019) and its 2019 theme Black Migrations, the Auburn Avenue Research Library (AARL) will host the photographic exhibition Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture, featuring selected images from AARL's archival collection. Homecoming: The Windows and Mirrors of Black Portraiture is a visualized metaphorical extension of the term migration, that emphasizes the use of portrait photography of and by Black people to construct and inhabit new social realities. This exhibition explores Black Portraiture as a transformative tool of self-representation and communal cultural preservation. In addition to mirroring the aesthetic aspirational sentiment within the Black Diasporic experience; these selected portraits also craft a compelling visual window into the radical self-reimaging of Blackness by the descendants of enslaved Africans, liberated from the White Eurocentric gaze. Curated by AARL staff this exhibition is made up of selected images from the African American Family History Association’s (AAFHA) Homecoming: African American Family History in Georgia photographic collection originally curated by Carole Merrit. This collection focuses on images of Black Georgia families from 1750 to the twentieth century. The mission of the AAFHA was "to engage the public in the research and appreciation of the family history of a people whose heritage has generally been unrecognized." This exhibit is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Remembrances Beyond the Veil: The Art of Mary Parks Washington
Archival Art Exhibit
Monday, March 11, 2019 - Sunday, May 26, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library is proud to present a fine art exhibition, featuring works by Mary Parks Washington, titled Atlanta: Remembrances Beyond the Veil, The Art of Mary Parks Washington. Curated by Charmaine Minniefield, Atlanta: Remembrances Beyond the Veil is a semi-autobiographical exhibition, thoughtfully collaged from the personal ephemera, communal memory and artistic vision of Mary Parks Washington. A familial reminiscence of her coming of age in Atlanta, this exhibition is a compelling visual reconstruction of a vanishing Black Mecca, with a profound contemporary relevance that peers deep into what W.E.B. Du Bois coined the “Black World beyond the veil”. Mary Parks Washington was born in Atlanta, Georgia on July 20, 1924. Her artistic talent was first recognized by her teachers at Booker T. Washington High School. Washington attended Spelman College, where she majored in art and studied under three prominent artist: sculptors Elizabeth Prophet, William Artist, and the painter Hale Woodruff. This exhibition is from the AARL Fine Art Collection and the Mary Parks Washington personal papers, etc. and is available for public research. This exhibit is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Fundi: The Story of Ella Baker
Film Screening and Discussion
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, May 29, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in collaboration with Artist/Activist Charmaine Minniefield, of The New Freedom Project, will host a screening of the documentary, Fundi: The Story of Ella Baker. While not as well known as famed leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, Ella Baker was the behind-the-scenes force that ensured the success of some of the movement's most important organizations and events. Her life and accomplishments are chronicled in this powerful documentary. "Fundi" was her nickname, from a Swahili word that means a person who passes down a craft to the next generation. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Red Summer:
The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America 
Public Lecture and Book Signing
3:00 p.m. Sunday, June 02, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with The Baton Foundation, Inc., will host historian and journalist Cameron McWhirter, who will discuss his book, Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America. This narrative history is an in-depth examination of the unprecedented wave of anti-Black violence that swept the United States for eight months (from April 1919 to November 1919). Focusing on the worst riots and lynchings—including those in Chicago, Washington, D.C., Charleston, Omaha, and Knoxville, this well-researched book also explores the heroic acts of resistance by black communities. Cameron McWhirter is a staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude from Hamilton College, where he majored in history. He earned a masters from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and has worked for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and The Detroit News. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, Ga 30303.
 
Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America   
Public Lecture and Book Signing
6:30 p.m.  Thursday, June 6, 2019 
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in collaboration with the Southern Center for Human Rights will host Professor James Forman Jr. as he discusses his publication, "Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America." A former public defender in Washington, D.C., Forman tells riveting stories of politicians, community activists, police officers, defendants, and crime victims trapped in terrible dilemmas. Locking Up Our Own enriches our understanding of why our society became so punitive and offers important lessons to anyone concerned about the future of race and the criminal justice system in this country. James Forman Jr. is a Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He has written many law review articles, op-eds, and essays for the New York Times, the Atlantic, the New Republic, the Nation, and the Washington Post. Locking Up Our Own is his first book. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta,
GA 30303.
 
Diversity in Children's Books
A Conversation with Best Selling Children Authors
Authors Panel Discussion
1:30 p.m. Friday, June 7, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in partnership with Cre8tive Con will host Diversity In Children's Books a community dialogue on the historical significance and contemporary relevance of children’s books by and about Black people. J. D. Myall is called the literary lunatic for a good reason. Myall is crazy about novels. Reading books and writing them comes as naturally as breathing to her. Julian Winters is a gay African American author who lives on the outskirts of Atlanta, Georgia. His love for writing comes from an intense passion to empower LGBTQIAP+ readers, especially young adults, with the positive notion that "happy endings do exist." Karen Strong was born and raised in the rural South. She spent most of her childhood wandering the woods, meadows, and gardens of her grandmother's land. A graduate of the University of Georgia, she is an advocate of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Breanna J. McDaniel is a Ph.D. researcher and a writer from Atlanta, GA. Her debut picture book Hands Up! recasts a charged phrase as part of a black girl's everyday life--hands up for a hug, hands up in class, hands up for a high five--before culminating in a moment of resistance at a protest march. Connie Schofield-Morrison is a mother, author, and entrepreneur. She spent most of her childhood reading and writing poetry, songs, and fairy tales. Her books are rhythmic, soulful affirmations that a dream can become a reality, a belief that Connie has seen play out in her own life. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey
Fine Art Exhibition 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - Sunday, September 09, 2019
Exhibition Artist Talk 3:00 p.m. Sunday,  June 16, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library is pleased to present Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey, a multimedia solo exhibition in which Tina Maria Dunkley presents prints, assemblages, and textiles based on her publication, The Merikins: Forgotten Freedom Fighters in the War of 1812. This exhibition is an evocative and visually riveting exploration into the lives of enslaved Africans who escaped bondage and fought for the British during the War of 1812. Through meticulous research into her own maternal ancestry, Dunkley learned of the plight of her ancestor, Ezekiel Loney, and other freedom fighters who fled a Virginian plantation in 1814. Loney was among 4,000 former slaves who, after the war, were settled in South Trinidad and called themselves Merikins, a creolization of “American”. Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey was organized by the Wilmer Jennings Gallery of Kenkeleba House and was made possible with support from the Judith Alexander Foundation, the Lubo Fund, and many other generous friends. This event is free and open to the public at
101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
In West Mills 
Authors Discussion and Book Signing 
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, June 12, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Charis Books and More, will host Author De'Shawn Charles Winslow as he discusses his novel, In West Mills. Set in an African American community in rural North Carolina from 1941 to 1987, In West Mills is a magnificent, big-hearted, small-town story about family, friendship, storytelling, and the redemptive power of love. De'Shawn Charles Winslow was born and raised in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. He is a 2017 graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and holds a BFA in creative writing and an MA in English literature from Brooklyn College. He lives in New York. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Social Justice: 
A Community Dialogue Honoring the Legacy of Nipsey Hussle
Panel Discussion / Community Dialogue  
7:00 p.m. Thursday, June 13, 2019
In recognition of Black Music Month and Juneteenth, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Social Justice, A Community Dialogue Honoring the Legacy of Nipsey Hussle. This discussion will serve as an in-depth exploration of Hip Hop culture’s historical legacy and ongoing contemporary role as a powerful catalyst for social change empowering marginalized Black communities. This panel discussion and community dialogue will be facilitated by Amber A. Harris of Just An Inch Entertainment. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Caribbean Film Festival - Fulton Public Library
Film Festival
Friday, June 14, 2019 - Sunday, June 16, 2019
In recognition of Caribbean American Heritage Month, the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History in collaboration with the African American Film Critics Association will host the 2019 Fulton County Caribbean Film Festival. This three-day film festival will provide a powerful cinematic platform that captures the scope and breadth of the Caribbean and its diasporic experiences.
Second Fridays at AARL Kicks Off the 2019 Fulton County Caribbean Film Festival
Poetry is an Island, Derek Walcott (St. Lucia) 79 minutes | Documentary
6:30 p.m. Friday, June 14.             
The Auburn Avenue Research Library’s (AARL), Second Fridays at Auburn is a quarterly informal social networking mixer for local creatives, cultural enthusiasts, and devoted Afrophiles to communally experience Africana art and culture in a relaxed interactive atmosphere. In observance of Caribbean American Heritage Month (2019, this Second Friday at Auburn event will Kicks Off the 2019 Fulton County Caribbean Film Festival with a taste of the Caribbean reception followed by a screening of Poetry is an Island, Derek Walcott. This documentary presents an intimate portrait of poet/playwright and Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott, set in his beloved native island St. Lucia.
                                                                
2:00 p.m.Saturday, June 15 
Forward Home: The Power of the Caribbean Diaspora (Caribbean Diaspora) 50 minutes | Documentary        
A documentary film, shot in 9 countries, revealing the economic power of the people of the Caribbean Diaspora living in global cities; the significance of their contribution to their homeland, as travelers and entrepreneurs. Locations: London, Toronto, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, Suriname, New York, Jamaica, Guyana, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago.
                                       
3:00 p.m. Saturday, June 15 
Diggers: The Men Who Built the Panama Canal (Panama) 90 min | Documentary
This documentary film examines the lives of black men who came from the West Indies (primarily Barbados and Jamaica) to work on the construction of the Panama Canal from 1881 to 1914.   
                         
5:00 p.m. Saturday, June 15  
Havana Time Machine 
 
3:00 p.m. Sunday, June 16 
The Merikins: America, Trinidad, and Canada's Forgotten History
This powerful documentary unveils the hidden history of the Merikins, enslaved Africans who secured their freedom by fighting for the British Army in the Corps of Colonial Marines during the War of 1812. At the war’s conclusion, these soldiers would emigrate from the United States to Trinidad establishing prosperous Black expatriate communities where some of their direct descendants continue to live.  This event will include a post-screening community dialogue with renowned artist Tina Dunkley whose multimedia solo exhibition, Sanctuary for the Internal Enemy: An Ancestral Odyssey presented at the Auburn Avenue Research Library responds to uncanny discovery of Trinidadian ancestry in the War of 1812.  
 
4:00 p.m. Sunday, June 16. 
Green Days by the River (Trinidad) 102 minutes | Drama 
Trinidadian film, directed by Michael Mooleedhar based on the novel of the same name by the Trinidadian author Michael Anthony. Set in 1952 Trinidad, the film follows Shell an ambitious African village boy struggling with poverty and his sick father finds solace in a wealthy Indian farmer, Mr. Gidharee, and his captivating daughter, until he falls for a city girl, and discovers the scheming entrapment of his solace that would shatter his love life and manhood. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Sinfo-Nia of Metropolitan Atlanta Black Music Month Summer Concert 
Live Performance 
11:00 a.m. Tuesday, June 18, 2019
In recognition of Black Music Month and Juneteenth, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Sinfo-Nia of Metropolitan Atlanta's Black Music Month Summer Concert. Named in honor of William Grant Still (May 11, 1895 - December3, 1978) the African American composer of more than 150 works, including five symphonies and eight operas, often referred to as "the Dean" of African American composers, the dean of Black composers, the still waters Youth Sinfo-Nia of Metropolitan Atlanta (Sinfo-Nia) provides premiere music and dance students instruction. Sinfo-Nia is led by the artistic direction of David E. Robinson, III, a 5th generation, string teacher of the Dekalb County School System. In 1979 Kenny Gamble, Ed Wright and Dyana Williams established June as a month-long celebration honoring Black music. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Real talk About LGBTQIAP
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer
Intersex, Asexual and Pansexual
Community Dialogue
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, June 26, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in collaboration with Charis Books and More is pleased to host author Tara Y. Coyt who will discuss her latest publication Real Talk About LGBTQIAP.A sincere conversation that explores contemporary LGBTQIAP issues, such as systemic marginalization, anti-LGBTQ state, and federal legislation, and hate crime violence, Real Talk presents a variety of voices including LGBTQ Institute Executive Director Ryan Roemerman, Fulton County Commission Co-Chair Joan Garner, Outwrite Bookstore Founder Philip Rafshoon, transgender activist Vandy Beth Glenn, and others from across the United States. Accessible and well researched Real Talk takes a deep dive into the lived experiences of each group represented by the acronym LGBTQIAP. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Research101: Africana Studies A Guide to Conducting Research at the Auburn Avenue Research Library
7:00 p.m. Thursday, June 27, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library will host Research 101: Africana Studies as a part of a progressive series of classes facilitated by AARL's Reference and Research staff. These instructional workshops support the ongoing development of foundational information literacy and research skills; promoting library resources and fostering culturally relevant lifelong learning. Research 101 is an accessible, culturally relevant introduction to information literacy concepts, including critical thinking regarding the construction of information, as well as techniques for accessing and evaluating information. Utilizing the Fulton County Library System collection of resource, with a special focus on those specific to the Auburn Avenue Research Library, related to the Black experience and Africana studies this course is influenced by ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which outlines threshold concepts for the mastery of information and computer literacy, but geared to meet researchers at any skill level. In recognition of National Caribbean-American Heritage Month (June) this Research 101 course will be themed around the Caribbean experience and global diaspora. This course is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Southern Voices in Harlem
The Creative Influence of Southerners in the Harlem Renaissance  
Panel Discussion and Community Dialogue 
7:00 p.m. Thursday, June 27, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Breaking New Media presents Southern Voices in Harlem: The Creative Influence of Southerners in the Harlem Renaissance. This panel discussion and community dialogue will celebrate the artistic and cultural contribution of the African American southern experience on the Harlem Renaissance.  Exploring the contributions of Zora Neale Hurston, Augusta Savage, Charles S. Johnson, and others, to the Harlem Renaissance through the lens of their Southern roots. This discussion will seek to deepen our collective understanding of one of the most impactful artistic and cultural movements in American history. This event will include a screening of the Harlem Renaissance period short film by BCR Media productions. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Lest We Forget: The Passage from Africa into the Twenty-First Century
Author Discussion and Book Signing
3:00 p.m. Saturday, June 29, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library is pleased to host, Historian Velma Maia Thomas, who will discuss her publication Lest We Forget: The Passage From Africa Into the Twenty-First Century. This elegant bind-up of three collectible books by Velma Maia Thomas—Lest We Forget, Freedom’s Children, and We Shall Not Be Moved—offers an intimate look at black history in America through the lens of a passionate historian, committed to preserving these important accounts, along with related memorabilia. Based on materials from the nationally acclaimed Black Holocaust Exhibit, Lest We Forget documents the plight of an estimated 100 million Africans, from their rich pre-slavery culture to their enslavement in a foreign land. This book is a collection of stirring historic papers, memoirs, personal effects, and photographs brought to life in a unique, three-dimensional, interactive format. Lest We Forget, chronicles the unyielding strength of a people who refused to be broken. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era:
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
13th by Ava DuVernay 
Public Screening and Community Dialogue
 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 03, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of Ava DuVernay, 13th, an in-depth look at the prison system in the United States and how it reveals the nation's history of racial inequality. This event will include a facilitated post-screening discussion. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event
is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era:
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
The Downward Spiral: Episode 1 of Slavery and the Making of America
Public Screening and Community Dialogue
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of  The Downward Spiral: Episode 1 of Slavery and the Making of America. In the 1620s, there were no limitations imposed on slaves. But by the early 18th century, the expanding slave trade caused many colonies to adopt strict "black codes," transforming the social system into one of legal racial oppression. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era:
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
Liberty in the Air: Episode 2 of Slavery and the Making of America
Public Screening and Community Dialogue
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of Liberty in the Air: Episode 2 of Slavery and the Making of America. From the 1740s to the 1830s, slavery continued to support economic development, but the Revolutionary War revealed the contradictions of a nation seeking independence while denying freedom to its black citizens. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Black Joy and Resistance: A photo book
Public Lecture / Community Dialogue 
3:00 p.m. Saturday, July 20, 2019
The Auburn Avenue Research Library in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum will host renowned photographer Adreinne Waheed, who will discuss her book of photography Black Joy and Resistance. What can be deemed as a visual representation of Maya Angelou’s, “And Still We Rise,” through her camera lens, Adreinne Waheed’s Black Joy & Resistance, masterfully captures, “The Souls of Black Folks”. Adreinne Waheed is a photographer, photo editor, and archivist based in Brooklyn, NY and Berkeley, CA. She has been making images since age 13. Her work has been published by The New York Times, The Fader, The Crisis, Scholastic, and Time Inc. Books. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era: 
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
Seeds of Destruction: Episode 3 of Slavery and the Making of America 
Public Screening and Community Dialogue
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 24, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of Seeds of Destruction: Episode 3 of Slavery and the Making of America. As the North adopted laws to abolish slavery, the South saw its greatest expansion of slavery. The abolitionist movement began to gather strength, contributing to the widening fissure and imminent break-up of the nation. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 
Revisiting the Founding Era: 
What, to the American Slave, is Your 4th of July?
The Challenge of Freedom:
Episode 4 of Slavery and the Making of America 
Public Screening and Community Dialogue 
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, 2019
As part of the American Library Association’s (ALA), Revisiting the Founding Era project, the Auburn Avenue Research Library will host a screening of The Challenge of Freedom: Episode 4 of Slavery and the Making of America. The complexities of the Civil War and Reconstruction are chronicled through the experience of slave Robert Smalls. The rise of militant groups and new segregation laws show that slavery's eradication had not ended black oppression. Revisiting the Founding Era is designed to provide librarians and local leaders with the resources and support they need to create engaging community conversations around the Founding Era ideas and themes that influence our lives today. This event is free and open to the public at 101 Auburn Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.
 

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