Events Listings

Continue to follow the AARL events page and social media for expansion project updates and ongoing events and exhibitions with the Hammonds House Museum and other collaborative community partners.

 

All events and exhibitions listed will be offsite until the completion of the Library expansion. Please check each event for location.

 

The Sisters Are Alright
Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America
Book Discussion and Signing
Friday, August 28, 2015 • 7:00 p.m.
The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Charis Books and More and Hammonds House Museum will host cultural commentator and journalist Tamara Winfrey Harris, who will discuss her latest publication The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America. Following in the footsteps of Ntozake Shange, Harris, explores the authentic lived experiences of black women, allowing them to serve as the architects of their own narratives, free from distortion or marginalization. An unapologetic celebration, The Sisters Are Alright reads like a beautiful choreopoem urgently asserting that the lives of black women matter. Tamara Winfrey Harris specializes in the intersection of race and gender with current events, politics and pop culture. Her work has appeared in The Chicago Sun-Times, Ms. and Bitch magazines. This event will be held at the Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

Looking for Langston

Film Screening

Thursday, September 03. 7:00 pm

In recognition of Atlanta Black Gay Pride (2015), the Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum, will host a screening of the acclaimed arthouse documentary, Looking for Langston. Black British filmmaker Isaac Julien`s Looking for Langston is a lyrical and poetic consideration of the life of revered Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes. Isaac Julien invokes Hughes as a black gay cultural icon, against an impressionistic, atmospheric setting that parallels a Harlem speakeasy of the 1920s with a 1980s London underground nightclub. Shot in sumptuous monochrome, this multilayered narrative combines archival footage with the newly staged set pieces, fantasy sequences, and an imagined love story. The result is a celebratory piece about artistic expression and the nature of desire. This film (60 minutes) contains adult themes and images and is not suitable for children. Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

Divine Feminine

Photographic Exhibit by Linda Costa Cheranichit

Sunday, September 13. - Sunday, November 1.

2:00 p.m. Sunday, September 13. Opening Event and Artist Talk

In recognition of Atlanta Celebrates Photography (2015), the Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum, will host Divine Feminine, an exhibition by light painting photographer Linda Costa Cheranichit. Inspired by Ifa, the African traditional belief system of the Yoruba peoples, also known as Candomble in the artist’s native country Brazil, Cheranichit shares her artistic interpretation of the divine found in everyday women of color. Via spontaneous experimental photography and lighting techniques, these images explore the Ifa deities that guide her life, and create a dreamlike magic realism, which honors the female form and spirit. This exhibition will be on display in the AARL Satellite Gallery at the Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples Street, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

The Untold Story about A Place Called Black Hollywood

Book Signing and Community Lecture

Tuesday, September 15. 7:00 pm

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the African American Cinema Gallery, and Hammonds House Museum, will host Len Gibson, President of African American Cinema Gallery, who will discuss his latest publication The Untold Story about A Place Called Black Hollywood. Featuring intimate interviews with a broad cross section of film and television insiders, this book explores how African Americans continue to make a place for themselves in an industry that originally had no place for them. Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

African & American

West Africans in Post-Civil Rights America

Book Discussion and Signing

Thursday, September 24. 5:00 pm

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with the Central Library, will host Dr. Violet Showers Johnson, Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies at Texas A&M University, and Dr. Marilyn Halter, Professor of History and American Studies at Boston University, who will discuss their latest publication, African & American: West Africans in Post-Civil Rights America. Drawing on a rich variety of sources, African & American explores issues of cultural identity formation and socioeconomic incorporation of first and second generation West African immigrants and refugees in the United States during the last forty years. Central Library, One Margaret Mitchell Square, Atlanta GA 30303.

       

Transatlantic Blackness on Film
The Cinematic Black Experience in the United Kingdom
3:00 p.m. Sapphire (92 minutes) Film Screening
5:00 p.m. Burning an Illusion (95 minutes) Film Screening
Saturday, September 26.
Bridging the Diasporic Divide between Black America and Black Britain, Hammonds House Museum, in collaboration with the Auburn Avenue Research Library and Narrative Eye, will host Transatlantic Blackness on Film: The Cinematic Black Experience in the United Kingdom. This event will present and explore how blackness and racial identities are represented in film created by and for Black Britains in the United Kingdom. Screenings will include the ground-breaking film, Sapphire, (92 min.) starring Nigel Patrick and Michael Craig, portraying two Scotland Yard detectives investigating the murder of a young black woman who had been passing for white; and the pioneering feature film, written and directed by Menelik Shabazz, Burning an Illusion, (95 min.) an intimate coming of age story that traces the emotional and political growth of a young British-born black woman in Margaret Thatcher's London. Narrative Eye is an afro-centric educational organization, operating out of the United Kingdom, dedicated to the production and promotion of creative works that document and challenge the inequalities and injustices faced by Black People throughout the Diaspora. This event will be held at the Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

Transatlantic Blackness
Black Like Me? Comparative Discourse on Race and Identity in the United States and United Kingdom
Community Discussion
Thursday, October 08. 7:00 p.m.
In an effort to bridge the diasporic divide between Black America and Black Britain, Hammonds House Museum, in collaboration with the Auburn Avenue Research Library and Narrative Eye, will host, Black Like Me? Comparative Discourse on Race and Identity in the U.S. and U.K. This community discussion, facilitated by British writer, law lecturer and historian Onyeka, will examine contemporary cross cultural similarities and distinct differences on how race is experienced and racial identities are formed in Black communities in the United States and the United Kingdom. This conversation will also explore the historical, socio-political, geographic and cultural (etc.) roots of these similarities and differences. Onyeka, will also discuss his latest publication Blackamoores: Africans in Tudor England a ground breaking exploration of the African Diaspora in Europe. Narrative Eye is an afro-centric educational organization, operating out of the United Kingdom, dedicated to the production and promotion of creative works that document and challenge the inequalities and injustices faced by Black People throughout the Diaspora. This event will be held at the Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

Transatlantic Blackness
The African Presence in the Renaissance Art of Europe
Community Discussion
Saturday, October 10. 10:30 a.m.
Hammonds House Museum in collaboration with the Auburn Avenue Research Library and the Narrative Eye, will host The African Presence in the Renaissance Art of Europe, facilitated by British writer, law lecturer and historian Onyeka. Bringing home the adage that “art makes the absent present” Onyeka will challenge the hegemonic white washing of European History by examining the presence of African peoples in Renaissance Art, which often reflected real individuals and authentic lived experiences. Focusing beyond common representations of exoticism and enslavement, this discussion will use art to traces the existence and identities of free descendants of enslaved Africans who entered mainstream European society at all levels. It will also explore the unexamined socio-political history between Europe and Africa reflected in Renaissance images of African diplomats, merchants, scholars, and heads of state. Onyeka, will also discuss his latest publication Blackamoores: Africans in Tudor England a ground breaking exploration of the African Diaspora in Europe. Narrative Eye is an afro-centric educational organization, operating out of the United Kingdom, dedicated to the production and promotion of creative works that document and challenge the inequalities and injustices faced by Black People throughout the Diaspora. This event will be held at the Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

Divine Feminine

Live Light Painting Performance

Saturday, October 24. 7:00 p.m.

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum, will host a live light painting performance by photographer Linda Costa Cheranichit. This innovative art performance invites viewers behind the curtain, to see for themselves, the spontaneous experimental photography and lighting techniques used to create the dreamlike magical realism of Linda Costa Cheranichit’s images. Audience members will witness a live performance piece, executed in total darkness, of a glowing Orixa procession captured by her lens in real time without digital manipulation. The resulting images, shared via projections, are sure to fascinate and delight. Inspired by Ifa, the African traditional belief system of the Yourba peoples, as practiced in Latin America, Cheranichit shares her interpretation of the divine found in everyday women of color and explores the feminine deities that motivate and guide her life and work. Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310. 

   

Unearthing the Gold Dust Twins on Auburn Avenue 

The Nostalgic Reimagining of Slavery in American Advertising and Visual Culture

Sunday, October 25. 3:00 p.m.

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum, will host Unearthing the Gold Dust Twins on Auburn Avenue: The Atlanta Mural and the Nostalgic Reimaging of Slavery in American Advertising and Visual Culture. Advertising icons of Gold Dust Washing Powder, Goldy and Dusty, two minstrel-like asexual African American children, represent a popular early 20th century reimaging of slavery in American advertising and visual culture. Facilitated by Velma Maia Thomas, public historian and author of the award winning book, Lest We Forget: The Passage from Africa to Slavery and Emancipation, this community lecture will examine the history and contemporary relevance of the Gold Dust Twins. Ms. Thomas will also discuss the unique story of the Gold Dust Twins’ advertising mural in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward and the ongoing debate about its future. Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.     

 

Night of the Living Dead (92 minutes) Film Screening    

Celebration of Horror Film Cult Hero Ben (Duane L. Jones)

Thursday, October 29. 7:00 p.m.

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Hammonds House Museum, will host a screening of George A. Romero's 1968 cult horror classic, Night of the Living Dead (1968).  Amid the real-life racial violence of 1968, including the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, African American actor Duane L. Jones anchored this provocative film as the ill-fated, yet heroic protagonist Ben. Refusing to play the role according to the original screen play, Duane L. Jones’ intelligent and compelling performance proved vital to the film’s success as a subversive socio-political critique 1960s America, and laid the foundation for the proactive militant African American antiheroes found in 1970s Blaxploitation films. Following the screening, there will be a post screening community discussion. This film (96 minutes) contains adult themes and images and is not suitable for children. Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310.

 

Baltimore Riots: Student Power Knowledge

Community Conference

Saturday, November 07. 10:00 am

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration Emory University, Morehouse College and Hammonds House Museum, will host Baltimore Riots: Student Power Knowledge. Facilitated by Dr. Lawrence Jackson (Emory University) and Dr. Samuel Livingston Morehouse College), this community conference will feature student panels and presentations focused on the challenges presented by confronting endemic urban crises. Hammonds House Museum, 503 Peeples St. SW, Atlanta, GA 30310. 

     

 

 

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